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Corona still eating into eatery profits

Georges Hall's Cafe on Haig is already noticing a good increase in business.

After getting their first taste of freedom as coronavirus lockdown restrictions ease, hundreds of diners are returning to shops to grab their daily fix of coffee as well as meals and snacks but will it be enough to keep local cafes and restaurants in business.

Outlets across Australia opened their doors for the first time on Friday after being allowed to only offer takeaway and closed for dining service for nearly eight weeks, with some bigger venues not re-opening because of the 10-patron policy.
Saying it was time to go, Condell Park Delicatessen owner Tina Scordino is hanging up her apron at the end of June after selling the business.
With the new owner’s plans for the site to keep operating as a deli, Tina said that after 29 years and the impact of Covid-19, now was the time to look after the grandchildren.
“Business is still down because people are being cautious and most aren’t back at work and still working from home,” she said.
“It’s been very tough; even though we are allowed 10 diners now, I would be lucky to have two dining in.
“I would like to thank all of my customers from the bottom of my heart; I’ve watched the generations grow and many have become my good friends. I will miss them all.”
Feeling a lot more optimistic after hearing students would be returning full-time to school next week, Georges Hall’s Cafe on Haig owner Amanda Filara says she is already noticing a good increase in business.
“The biggest change, of course, was when everyone was allowed to go out again from last Friday,” she said.
Calling the impact of the coronavirus lockdown on business ‘a disaster’, Campsie Cafe Metrio’s Erin Murray says cafes and restaurants are still struggling.
“It is definitely a blessing that people can come in now, sit down and enjoy a coffee and get some normalcy back in their lives but for us, we’re still waiting for it all to kick off again,” she said.
“We’ve had to cut our hours and are just waiting for the restrictions to ease further so that more people will feel confident about getting out and about.
“A little government help wouldn’t hurt either.”
Bankstown City Plaza’s Flying Zebra manager Camy Nguyen says business is going a little better.
“It’s good to see more people on the streets, even more traffic, a sign of life getting back to normal,” he said.
“Now people can come and have coffee like they used to; we just hope it keeps picking up.”
Bankstown Central’s Coffee Club staff say business has improved 100 per cent.

Condell Park Delicatessen owner Tina Scordino is hanging up her apron at the end of June after selling the business.

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